rolex replica fake rolex replica breitling watches replica panerai cartier fake watches tag heuer fake watches
 Home |   About Us  Submit a Legal Question to Unequal Justice News Find a Black Attorney | Submit a News Story |   Contact Us  

Brazil politician changes his name to Barack Obama, runs for Congress
Brazilian politician Claudio Henrique dos Anjos resembles the U.S. leader and is now banking on the name of the two term President to help his Congressional bid.

The 45-year-old Brazilian failed to make it far in a previous local mayoral election, so he decided to register as Claudio Henrique Barack Obama in his bid for Congress.

Though prosecutors tried to block him, a court ruled that his name can appear as “Barack Obama” on the October 5 ballot.

Along with the name, he is copying Obama’s design for campaign swag and is relying on social media to reach younger voters, he told Brazilian TV news “Orjornaldo Hoje.”

Brazil’s Barack tried in 2008 to become the first black mayor of the poverty stricken Rio suburb of Belford Roxo and though unsuccessful, his nickname earned him attention.

“It started as a joke, in a playful, affectionate way. And then it picked up steam, until it became serious,” he said in a 2008 Frontline documentary, “The Obama Samba.”

President Obama "influenced, contributed, helped, or even just lent his name to the people. And if they used his name to promote change, or to create a more just society, then we welcome 8, 80, 800 or even 8 million Obamas,” he added.

Though not quite 8 million Obamas have come out of the woodwork, four other Brazilian Obamas running for Congress will appear on the national ballot this year: Cosme Barack Obama, Obama Brasil, Obama de Colombo and Samuel Obama.
Black Headline News
 
 
New Feature Search BlackLegalIssues
Log In or Register Here
 
 
        

            Latest News            Legal Commentary              Did You Know?...
Leslie Larson Aug-22-2014 65 0
Brazilian politician Claudio Henrique dos Anjos resembles the U.S. leader and is now banking on the name of the two term President to help his Congressional bid.

The 45-year-old Brazilian failed to make it far in a previous local mayoral election, so he decided to register as Claudio Henrique Barack Obama in his bid for Congress.

Though prosecutors tried to block him, a court ruled that his name can appear as “Barack Obama” on the October 5 ballot.

Along with the name, he is copying Obama’s design for campaign swag and is relying on social media to reach younger voters, he told Brazilian TV news “Orjornaldo Hoje.”

Brazil’s Barack tried in 2008 to become the first black mayor of the poverty stricken Rio suburb of Belford Roxo and though unsuccessful, his nickname earned him attention.

“It started as a joke, in a playful, affectionate way. And then it picked up steam, until it became serious,” he said in a 2008 Frontline documentary, “The Obama Samba.”

President Obama "influenced, contributed, helped, or even just lent his name to the people. And if they used his name to promote change, or to create a more just society, then we welcome 8, 80, 800 or even 8 million Obamas,” he added.

Though not quite 8 million Obamas have come out of the woodwork, four other Brazilian Obamas running for Congress will appear on the national ballot this year: Cosme Barack Obama, Obama Brasil, Obama de Colombo and Samuel Obama.

Philip Caulfield Aug-21-2014 99 0
Police and neighbors on Chicago's South Side are hunting for a gunman after a 9-year-old boy was killed in a hail of bullets in the backyard of an apartment building near his home Wednesday.

Antonio Smith, 9, was pronounced dead at Comer Children's Hospital about an hour after he was shot in the chest, hands and arms in the Greater Grand Crossing neighborhood at about 4 p.m., The Chicago Tribune reported.

So far, there were no suspects, and police did not have a description of the killer.

"He was just a child, just a baby, still had a whole life ahead of him. Just a child," Kenya Eggleston, one of the boy's cousins, told reporters outside the hospital Wednesday. "When is it going to stop?"

Rasheda Eggelston, another cousin, pleaded with the shooter to surrender, calling the victim "an innocent baby."

"He didn't deserve it," Eggelston said.

Police said the charming third-grader had recently moved to the South Side neighborhood with his family.

Ashiea Smith, who lives in the building, told local ABC 7 the boy may have been chased.

"We don't know what happened. We don't know if he was running from someone. This is a dead-end alley," Smith, who is not related to the boy, told the station. "So he had to be running from somebody trying to go up on the tracks and cross over."


The boy was shot several times behind some buildings in the Greater Grand Crossing neighborhood at around 4 p.m. He died later at a hospital.
CBS Chicago

The boy was shot several times behind some buildings in the Greater Grand Crossing neighborhood at around 4 p.m. He died later at a hospital.


Police told the Tribune the neighborhood had been plagued by gang violence recently, though they don't believe the boy or his family had any ties.

Antonio's death came on the same day seven others were wounded in shootings across the city, including a 14-year-old boy who was hit in the arm while standing on a street on the Northwest Side at 9:30 p.m., ABC 7 reported.

On the South Side, neighbors who knew Antonio and his family described him as a charming, energetic little boy who liked to impress people with his dance moves.

"I'm just going to put (his family) in my prayers," Chrishawda Wilcox told the Tribune.

Nina Golgowski Aug-21-2014 103 0
St. Louis police fatally shot a knife-wielding man during an afternoon confrontation with officers Tuesday, according to police.

Kajieme Powell, 25, allegedly refused to drop his weapon after stealing from a Six Stars Market convenience store along Riverview Blvd. around 12:30 p.m., KTVI reported.

Powell allegedly yelled, "Shoot me, kill me now!" Police Chief Sam Dotson told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

The officers ordered him to stop and drop his weapon. He instead came within two or three feet of them, causing them to open fire, said Dotson.

Powell, who had allegedly stolen two energy drinks and a pastry according to KMOV, was pronounced dead at the scene.

Dotson said no officers were hurt in the incident that took place roughly five miles southeast of Ferguson, where demonstrations over the police shooting death of unarmed teen Michael Brown have raged on.

"Officers gave suspect verbal commands. Officers feared for their safety and both officers fired their weapons," Dotson tweeted.

Both officers involved in the fatal shooting have been placed on administrative leave according to department policy, stated Dotson.

In a 911 call posted by St. Louis Public Radio, a woman who owned a barbershop near the scene said Powell seemed agitated while walking back and forth in front of the convenience store.

"He just seems very upset. I don't know what he's getting ready to do," the woman told the dispatcher. "I locked my door, I don't want this guy to come in here."


"He's upset — he's got a knife in his hand," she said. "He's got a knife in his pocket. He must be threatening the store owner."

Meg Wagner Aug-21-2014 103 0
The shooter accused of gunning down at least four men in two states said he murdered a New Jersey teenager as revenge for Muslims killed overseas.

According to court documents, Ali Muhammad Brown described his June murder of 19-year-old Brendan Tevlin as a "just kill" and said it was an act of "vengeance" meant to compensate for U.S. military killings in the Middle East.

In addition to Tevlin's murder, Brown has been charged will fatally shooting three men in Seattle. All four men were gunned down in remote areas late at night, NJ.com reported.

He is currently held in Newark, but he may be extradited to Washington state.

Brown is a devout Muslim opposed to U.S. intervention overseas, especially Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria and Iran, prosecutors said.

"All these lives are taken every single day by America, by this government. So a life for a life," he told investigators, according to the documents.

Brown further justified killing Tevlin by claiming the shooting was a "just kill," meaning he targeted an adult man and did not put any women, children or elderly people in danger.

In police interviews, Brown described the U.S.'s military campaign in the Middle East as evil and said if a "man sees evil, then he must take action against that evil," the court papers show.

Police maintained that the June 25 shooting started as a robbery.

Officers said Brown fired 10 shots into Tevlin's Jeep Liberty when it was stopped at intersection early in the morning in West Orange, N.J. Then he got into the 19-year-old's car and drove it to a nearby apartment complex to abandon it

Two co-defendants, Eric Williams and Jeremy Villagran, fled the scene of the shooting before Brown took off in the Jeep, police said.

Brown was linked to the New Jersey shooting after police identified the weapon used as the same one used in several Seattle killings.

Police in Seattle said Brown shot and killed 30-year-old Leroy Henderson in April on a state road outside of the city. Investigators said Brown had no relationship to his alleged victim and the crime was likely motivated by robbery, drugs or crime.

Brown also allegedly gunned down Ahmed Said and Dwone Anderson-Young in June after meeting them at a Seattle nightclub.

The alleged summer shooting spree is not the 29-year-old's first run in with police.

Brown was arrested in 2004 for his part in a massive Seattle bank fraud scheme, the New Jersey newspaper reported. Police originally thought the accused crime ring shipped stolen money overseas to terrorists, but that claim was never backed up with evidence.

Dareh Gregorian Aug-21-2014 187 0
Maybe they should call it White People magazine.

The recently axed lone black editor of People says she was discriminated against by her boss, and that the popular magazine is biased against African-Americans in general.

People is "a discriminatory organization run entirely by white people who intentionally focus the magazine on stories involving white people and white celebrities," Tatsha Robertson's bombshell lawsuit says.

The 48-year-old Robertson, "the only Black Senior Editor the magazine has ever had," was laid off in May, according to the suit.

She says only five of the mag’s 110 employees were black, and that now-former executive editor Betsy Gleick treated her like a second class-citizen when she came to the magazine from another Time Inc. publication, Essence, in 2010.

"You need to talk like everyone else here. You're not at Essence anymore," Gleick is quoted in the suit as saying.

She says Gleick left her out of important meetings, and denigrated her attempts to do more stories on black people. Robertson said when she pitched a story about an African-American model who'd been killed, Gleick told her the victim looked like a “slut” and the magazine wasn't interested.

“You know the rule — white suburban women in distress," she said, according to the suit. She also allegedly said the magazine was only interested in stories involving "white, middle-class suburbia."

Gleick, 51, followed Robertson out the door in June.

She did not return a call for comment Wednesday.

A spokesperson for People said, "People declines to comment."

When the magazine does put black people on its cover, they're held to a different standard, the suit says. Although People "put Trayvon Martin on its cover, Ms. Gleick was completely obsessed with attempting to unearth any potential negative fact about him before doing so," the suit says. "Ms. Gleick repeatedly questioned whether he was a 'good kid,' yet never made efforts to vet white victims of crime."

Cover stories on African-Americans were a rarity — the suit says a "black individual was the main feature" on the cover "exactly twice" in 2013, when the magazine put out 60 issues.

"In total since 2010, only 14 out of 265 covers have been focused on African-American individuals," the suit says.

And since 1990, "only three individuals selected as the ‘Most Beautiful Person’ have been black, out of 25 selections."

Robertson's lawyer, David Gottlieb of Wigdor LLP, said, "The media has a responsibility to report and act with integrity. People Magazine has betrayed that responsibility by engaging in discrimination, both in its pages and through its employment practices."

The suit says that with Robertson gone, "One can only imagine that it will be 'business as usual' at People Magazine going forward — more white people on covers, more stories about white people, and a completely dismissive attitude towards African-American employees."

The suit seeks unspecified money damages from People, Time Inc. and Glei

AP Aug-20-2014 93 0
Attorney General Eric Holder sought Wednesday to reassure the people of Ferguson about the investigation into Michael Brown's death and said he understands why many black Americans do not trust police, recalling how he was repeatedly stopped by officers who seemed to target him because of his race.

Holder made the remarks during a visit to the St. Louis suburb that has endured more than a week of unrest fueled by the fatal shooting of the black 18-year-old by a white officer. The Obama administration intended the trip to underscore its commitment to civil rights in general and the Ferguson case in particular.

The attorney general described how he was stopped twice on the New Jersey Turnpike and accused of speeding. Police searched his car, going through the trunk and looking under the seats.

"I remember how humiliating that was and how angry I was and the impact it had on me," Holder said during a meeting with about 50 community leaders at the Florissant campus of St. Louis Community College.

Police arrest a man as they disperse a protest in Ferguson, Mo., early Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014. On Saturday, Aug. 9, a white police officer fatally shot unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown, who was black, in the St. Louis suburb.AP Photo: Charlie Riedel

Holder also met with federal officials investigating Michael Brown's Aug. 9 death and with Brown's parents.

Once while living in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, Holder was running to catch a movie with his cousin when a squad car rolled up and flashed its lights at the pair. The officer yelled, "Where are you going? Hold it!" Holder recalled.

His cousin "started mouthing off," and Holder urged him to be quiet.

"We negotiate the whole thing, and we walk to our movie. At the time that he stopped me, I was a federal prosecutor. I wasn't a kid," he said.

Holder met briefly with Missouri State Highway Patrol Capt. Ron Johnson, who has been in charge of security in Ferguson for nearly a week. The National Guard is also helping to keep the peace.

Asked whether he had confidence in the local investigation of the police officer, Johnson said Holder's presence "is a guarantee on that."

In nearby Clayton, a grand jury began hearing evidence to determine whether the officer, Darren Wilson, should be charged in Brown's death. A spokesman for St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch said there was no timeline for the process, but it could take weeks.

Outside the St. Louis County Justice Center, where the grand jury convened, two dozen protesters gathered in a circle for a prayer, chanted and held signs urging McCulloch to step aside.

McCulloch's deep family connections to police have been cited by some black leaders who question his ability to be impartial in the case. McCulloch's father, mother, brother, uncle and cousin all worked for the St. Louis Police Department, and his father was killed while responding to a call involving a black suspect.

The prosecutor, who is white, has insisted his background will have no bearing on the handling of the Brown case, which has touched off days of nighttime protests during which authorities used tear gas and rubber bullets to clear the streets.

On Wednesday, police said an officer had been suspended for pointing a semi-automatic assault rifle at demonstrators, then cursing and threatening to kill one of them. A protester captured the exchange on video Tuesday and posted it to YouTube and other websites.

Some protesters returned to the streets Wednesday evening but in diminishing numbers. They marched around a single block as a thunderstorm filled the sky with lighting and dumped rain. Police still stood guard, but many wore regular uniforms rather than riot gear.

In a letter published in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Holder promised a thorough investigation while calling for an end to the violence in Ferguson. He said the bond of trust between law enforcement and the public is "all-important" but also "fragile."

Arrest patterns "must not lead to disparate treatment under the law, even if such treatment is unintended. And police forces should reflect the diversity of the communities they serve," Holder wrote.

The Justice Department has mounted an unusually swift and aggressive response to Brown's death, conducting an independent autopsy and sending dozens of FBI agents to Ferguson in search of witnesses to the shooting.

Meanwhile, Brown's funeral arrangements were set. The funeral will be Monday at Friendly Temple Missionary Baptist Church in St. Louis, according to the Austin A. Layne Mortuary, which is handling arrangements.

Brown's uncle, the Rev. Charles Ewing, will deliver the eulogy. The Rev. Al Sharpton will also speak.

Brown will be buried at St. Peter's Cemetery in St. Louis County.

Holder said the Obama administration has been working to achieve change through the Justice Department's civil rights division.

"The same kid who got stopped on the New Jersey freeway is now the attorney general of the United States," he added. "This country is capable of change. But change doesn't happen by itself."

Deborah Hastings Aug-20-2014 163 0
The California Highway Patrol has announced that a suspended officer may face serious charges for straddling a woman on a freeway shoulder and punching her repeatedly in the head.

Daniel Andrew has also been removed from duty, the CHP said Wednesday in a statement provided to the Daily News.

Andrew was videotaped July 1 beating a 51-year-old woman who had been walking along Interstate 10, near the LaBrea Ave. exit in Los Angeles. The violent footage went viral on YouTube and generated far-ranging criticism of Andrew's actions.

At one point, he sits on top of Marlene Pinnock and continues to rain down blows on the woman's face and head as she screams and struggles.

Pinnock has sued the state patrol agency and claims she was placed under a 72-hour psychiatric hold after the attack to give Andrew and the department time to cover it up.

The CHP's criminal investigation of the videotaped beating has been given to the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office, which will determine whether to file charges.

Andrew has claimed he was trying to protect the woman, who was wandering into traffic lanes, he said.



Philip Caulfield Aug-20-2014 117 0
Washington Redskins players showed support for slain Missouri teen Michael Brown on Monday night by running on to the field with their hands up during the team's introductions.

Safety Brandon Meriweather led the team's defensive backs through a tunnel and onto FedEx Field with their hands raised, a nod to the "Hands up, don't shoot" pose that has become a rallying cry for protesters in Ferguson.

Brown, 18, was shot and killed on Aug. 9 by a police officer during an encounter on a street in the St. Louis suburb.

Brown was unarmed, and witnesses said he had his hands were up when Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson killed him.

After the game — in which the Redskins beat the Cleveland Browns 24-23 — members of the defensive unit acknowledged their solemn entrance was a show of solidarity for Brown and his supporters.

Meriweather and some other veterans came up with the idea and rallied the younger players to go along with it, some players told reporters.

"We just wanted everybody to know that we support Michael and acknowledge what happened in Ferguson,'' Meriweather told USA Today. "It was all of ours idea, something we decided to do as a group just to show our support.''

"That could have been any one of us," safety Ryan Clark told the Washington Post, referring to Brown. "That could have been any one of our brothers, our cousins, just anyone."

"We have voices, even though sometimes we don't like to see it that way, we do have voices. We got the opportunity to do something," he said.

Aug-19-2014 142 0
A police officer was involved in a shooting Tuesday in St. Louis, about three miles from where Michael Brown was shot and killed in the turbulent suburb of Ferguson, police confirmed.

There was a heavy police presence at the scene, and police marked off the intersection with yellow tape.

Chief Sam Dotson of the St. Louis metropolitan police said on Twitter that the suspect had brandished a knife at police.

Further details were unclear.

Aug-19-2014 223 0
The Illinois teenager accused of bludgeoning her mother to death in a Bali hotel room had punched, pushed and bitten the 62-year-old before, police reports reveal.

But despite the slew of reports, Sheila von Wiese-Mack never pressed charges against her apparently violent daughter, the Chicago-Tribune reported.

Heather Mack, 19, and her 21-year-old boyfriend, Tommy Schaefer, are set to stand trial for murder. Police in Indonesia said the pair beat von Wiese-Mack to death last week and left her body in a suitcase at the St. Regis Bali.

But the Chicago-area mom had refused to get mental health help for the teen for years, the reports showed.

In 2010, Oak Park police recommended Mack be admitted to a mental hospital after the teen punched von Wiese-Mack. The mother refused, and the family agreed to try to get along.

The truce didn't last.

Later in 2010, von Wiese-Mack accused her daughter of stealing from the family home.

Then in 2011, Mack allegedly pushed her mom so hard von Wiese-Mack broke her arm. The teen disconnected the home's phone so the mother couldn't call for help, she claimed.

More 2011 reports detail accounts of Mack biting and hitting her mother.

Not once did von Wiese-Mack press charges: She told officers that sending her daughter to jail wouldn't help anything.

Between 2004 and 2013, Oak Park police responded to the Mack family home 86 times, NBC Chicago reported. A number of those involved the mother and daughter fighting.

Mack and Schaefer have been held in Bali since Wednesday, and investigators believe the couple killed the 62-year-old after a Monday night argument.

The couple has filed a series of complaints against local police: Mack's lawyer, Michael Elkin, said his client has been sexually assaulted several times while she has been detained.

The 19-year-old, who is apparently pregnant, said she had not been given enough water, and received only "vitamin pills" as medical attention for her pregnancy, Elkin told NBC Chicago.

Schaefer complained about the quality of food in the prison, claiming he was served KFC.

Police maintained the two are being treated like any other prisoner.



JESSE J. HOLLAND of Associated Press Aug-19-2014 104 0
For one night, all was well in Ferguson, Missouri. After a change in police command, violent protests decrying the shooting death of unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown at the hands of white police officer Darren Wilson suddenly gave way to peaceful demonstrations.

A day later, Ferguson police, under pressure to disclose Wilson's name, also revealed that Brown was suspected of stealing cigars from a local store before his deadly encounter with Wilson. That announcement was met with disbelief and anger by several residents, who said police were trying to smear Brown's name to justify his shooting.

And the streets of Ferguson exploded anew.

Brown's death is the latest illustration of deep divisions between minorities and police that have simmered for generations. Concern about the events playing out in Ferguson has coursed all the way up to the White House. President Barack Obama said Attorney General Eric Holder would go to Missouri this week to check on the independent federal investigation into Brown's death.

"In too many communities around the country, a gulf of mistrust exists between local residents and law enforcement," the president said.

The depth of this distrust becomes obvious in polling. While the unrest was occurring in Missouri, almost two-thirds of blacks — 65 percent — surveyed by the Pew Research Center said police went too far in their response to the Ferguson protests, while one-third of whites agreed and nearly another third said the police response has been about right. The Pew survey was conducted Aug. 14-17.

Gallup polling between 2012 and 2014 showed that a majority of blacks, or 64 percent, had only some, very little or no confidence in the police, while the majority of the whites questioned, or 58 percent, had either a great deal or quite a lot of confidence in the police. Between 2009 and 2011, Gallup found 61 percent of blacks only had partial or no confidence in police, while 62 percent of whites had a lot of confidence in the police.

One factor that breeds distrust is racial disparity between police and the communities they serve. Ferguson is nearly 70 percent black, while the police department is more than 90 percent white.

Distrust is also fueled by a perception of unchecked police violence through the ages: the 1992 acquittal of four white Los Angeles police officers in the beating of black motorist Rodney King; the 1967 beating in Newark, New Jersey, of cab driver John Smith; Miami in 1980, after the acquittal of six white police officers in the beating death of black motorcyclist Arthur McDuffie; Cincinnati in 2001 after 19-year-old Timothy Thomas was shot and killed by a police officer. Rioting followed each of these cases.

"More African-Americans and Latinos believe police stop people without due cause, use excessive force and engage in verbal abuse than white Americans," said Ronald Weitzer, a George Washington University sociology professor who has studied race and policing in the U.S. and internationally. "So they not only tend to see the police as having some racial biases, but also in their day-to-day activities behaving in ways that are more obtrusive and maybe unjustified in dealing with citizens."

Brown was shot multiple times by Wilson on Aug. 9. Police have said little about the encounter, except that it involved a scuffle in which Wilson was injured and Brown was shot. Witnesses say Brown had his hands in the air as the officer fired multiple rounds.

Tensions boiled over after a candlelight vigil the next night, as looters smashed and burned businesses, while police fired tear gas and smoke bombs. Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri Highway Patrol, who is black, was placed in charge of security, a move that was cheered in Ferguson. He ordered his officers to abandon the body armor and gas masks and instead ensure the public's right to peaceably assemble.

But things escalated again Aug. 15, after Ferguson police released Wilson's name along with video they said showed Brown robbing a store shortly before he was killed. Brown's family condemned the revelation, with lawyer Anthony Gray calling it a "sideshow."

Weitzer described several different forms of police behavior that breed distrust, particularly among black and Latino males. That included unwarranted stops of individuals on the street by police, such as New York police's highly criticized "stop-and-frisk" tactic, he said.

"They're not only more likely to be stopped by police and subjected to some kind of abuse, but it also happens repeatedly, and this is something we don't see in the white community," Weitzer said.

Although the St. Louis County medical examiner had conducted an autopsy, Brown's family ordered their own. It found that Brown had been shot at least six times, twice in the head. Family attorney Benjamin Crump said Monday that Brown's parents "could not trust what was going to be put in the reports about the tragic execution of their child." The Justice Department planned to conduct its own autopsy.

Without directly referencing the video revelation, Holder said he was troubled by "the selective release of sensitive information" surrounding Brown's case, and said his agency would preserve the integrity of its investigation, "no matter how others pursue their own separate inquiries."

"This is a critical step in restoring trust between law enforcement and the community, not just in Ferguson, but beyond," Holder said.

American University professor Cathy Lisa Schneider, who wrote a book on urban unrest, said distrust breeds frustration with police when there is no avenue of redress "and usually an increasing intensity of police violence."

It's "almost always cases of where the local authorities are completely impervious to the concerns of people who are vulnerable to police violence and do not know how to stop it," Schneider said. "It is the most potent symbol of racial domination and subjection. It is also the most painful."

Aug-18-2014 2002 0
After months of requesting the autopsy report in connection with the shooting death of Marquise Jones, Daryl K. Washington, the attorney representing the family received a copy today. The autopsy report confirms what eyewitnesses to the shooting on February 28 have said all alone; Marquise Jones was shot in the back.

Officer Robert Encina, a six-year veteran of the San Antonio Police Department, was in full uniform working security at Chacho's in the 8600 block of Perrin Beitel Road, when he approached the driver of the vehicle 23 year Old Marquise Jones was a passenger in to question him after he barely bumped a vehicle in the front of him. Marquise Jones had no involvement with the accident and was not questioned. After witnessing how Officer Encina was treating the driver, Jones became afraid and decided to leave since he was not being questioned and/or requested not to leave. It was at this point the Officer pulled out his service revolver and shot Marquise Jones in the back. The accounts of the shooting were confirmed by two eyewitnesses who were also passengers in the vehicle.

The autopsy report confirmed that Marquise Jones died as a result of a gunshot wound to the back. There was no evidence of close range firing. As of this date, no charges have been filed against Officer Encina. Three years before shooting Jones to death, Officer Encina was suspended for 45 days for trying to fight African-American patrons of another eatery where he worked security.

According to an earlier story, Encina was off duty and appeared drunk when he targeted black customers and yelled obscenities at others during the April 2010 incident at a Mama Margie's on the Northwest Side, a San Antonio Police Department internal affairs report states.

The parents of Marquise Jones hope that Encina will not only be fired but he will also be charged with the murder of their son. The family is asking for the District Attorney to charge Officer Encina with a crime.

Aug-18-2014 203 0
A 21-year-old man accused with his girlfriend of killing her mother and stuffing her body in a suitcase is apparently offended he was served KFC in a Bali prison.

Tommy Schaefer complained to authorities that the fried fare is not good enough for the couple, police sources told news.com.au. However, cops say they that KFC is a luxury item in Bali and is not even affordable for the poor.

“We have already given treatment that Tommy Schaefer is more than normal,” Denpasar Police Chief Djoko Hari Utomo told news.com.au, when asked about the treatment of Schaefer's 19-year-old pregnant girlfriend Heather Mack. “We give the same food for all suspects. We also give special attention to her as she is still young. This is a transition period for her."

Schaefer and Mack are accused of killing 62-year-old Sheila von Wiese-Mack, whose body was discovered in a suitcase in Bali on Aug. 12. If convicted in the slaying of the Chicago woman, the couple could face the death penalty by firing squad, according to Indonesia law.

Sheila von Wiese-Mack had squared off with her daughter many times, especially since 2006, when her husband died. During a nine-year period, cops went to the family's Illinois home 86 times on domestic violence and theft calls, NBC Chicago reported.

Authorities also said that Heather Mack is going through a normal pregnancy, not an ectopic one, as she claimed, according to news.com.au.

However, the lawyer for Mack says he is concerned for her health, he told CBS in Chicago. Michael Elkin told the station that his client said she had been sexually assaulted on multiple occasions.

“I said, 'Were you touched?’ And she said ‘Yes,' Elkin told CBS. "I said, ‘Were you touched inappropriately?’ And she said ‘Yes.'"

>>--More Black Legal News

Daryl K. Washington Apr-28-2014 681 0
Sadly but real, it appears as though society feels you can treat a black person poorly by simply offering to give them something of value and everything is forgotten. This mindset has to go away otherwise racism and injustices will remain. Whenever I file a civil rights lawsuit the first question the media asks is how much money the family is asking for? My response is always very clear; the family wants JUSTICE and expects for the individual responsible for the act to be held responsible for his/her criminal acts.

On yesterday, 5-10 multimillionaires played a game of basketball despite being made aware that the owner they are earning millions for hates black people, especially black males. By not playing on yesterday they could have sent a major message out and forced the NBA to react immediately but they gave Donald Sterling and the NBA a way out. Let's face it, the Clippers are no candidate to win the NBA Championship this year so this was/is their opportunity to make a change but instead they are showing America that money and a championship is much more important than fighting blatant racism.

I have to admit that I'm truly disappointed in the Los Angeles Clippers. Professional athletes will stage a sit out when they feel they are not being paid enough money but they will continue to play for a racist owner who admitted to not want black people at the game and use the excuse that we are playing for a championship. Will we continue to turn our heads for money?

Many people criticized the football players at Grambling when they staged a protest last year. If those kids lost their scholarships they could probably not afford to attend college but they took the chance because they wanted to take a stand against what they consider poor playing conditions. They had the courage to do something that the Los Angeles Clippers, a group of multimillionaires, are not willing to do. What message are we sending to the World? You can tell millionaires you hate them but they will still work for you as long as they are being paid. Truly a lost opportunity. All money is not good money.

Daryl K. Washington is an attorney located in Dallas, Texas. His practice includes Sports and Entertainment, Civil Rights, Litigation and Business Transactions. You can reach Daryl at dwashington@dwashlawfirm.com or you can visit his website at www.dwashlawfirm.com. To receive updates, go to the Black Legal Issues page on Facebook and check the like button
Daryl K. Washington Apr-27-2014 722 0
Donald Sterling made comments about Black people that have started a lot of conversation. Many people, including myself, have said that it will place Coach Doc Rivers and the players in an awkward situation but after thinking about it, it will also place White people in an awkward position and here's my opinion why. During the Civil Rights movement there were White people on the front lines and there were many who did not agree with the poor treatment of Black people. They were instrumental in helping with the fight for equal treatment.

Fast forward to today. 95% of the fans at the Clippers games are not Black and the majority are White people. It would be a great show of support if the White fans were as insulted by Donald Sterling's comments as Black people are. The games will go on but wouldn't it be great if the White fans proved to the country that they don't support a racist owner. We know it will not happen but only until everyone voice their dislike of what was said will a true change ever be made.

Donald Sterling's views are shared by so many individuals who will allow our talented Black athletes to attend the large colleges because they earn millions of dollars for the schools but will fight tooth and nails to prevent a young Black kid who may have not scored well on a standardized test from attending.

College athletes are fighting to be paid but I think what should be added to their agenda is the equal treatment of their brothers and sisters who are being denied admission to the same universities they are earning millions of dollars for. The fight should not be for money but for equality. Let’s never allow someone to pay us to keep our views to ourselves. We still have a long way to go. We will never get there unless we ALL come together.

Daryl K. Washington is an attorney located in Dallas, Texas. His practice includes Sports and Entertainment, Civil Rights, Litigation and Business Transactions. You can reach Daryl at dwashington@dwashlawfirm.com or you can visit his website at www.dwashlawfirm.com. To receive updates, go to the Black Legal Issues page on Facebook and check the like button.

Daryl K. Washington Feb-16-2014 941 0
After the Michael Dunn verdict was read many voice their displeasure with the judicial system, rightfully so. However, the killing of our young black men is nothing new. Each time something bad happens we come together as a group for a month or so and then the energy dies down. When the Zimmerman verdict came back there were those who demanded that we stop supporting the state of Florida yet what happened to the follow-up to let us know how effective the efforts were? It reminds me of whenever someone dies. When we run into people we have not seen in years we all make a vow to do better and to make time for each other but after two or three months has past by we are all back to doing the same things.

As a country, we came together after 9/11 but soon thereafter the unity went away. There's so much happening in our communities. I thought the Zimmerman verdict would be our wake up call to do more but our young black men continue to be gunned down at a high rate by Men who don't look anything close to their fathers and most of them get away with it. Just in case you mention the black on black crime, remember that the killer normally ends up in prison.

Just recently, the grand jury failed to indict a North Carolina police officer for the killing of Jonathan Ferrell, a young black male, but after there was a public outcry about the injustice that took place he was eventually indicted. Right here in Dallas, Texas we have black men being killed by white police officers and in a great majority of the cases, the police officers are not indicted and judged by a jury of their peers. Instead, the victim is placed on trial and society has become conditioned to believe that it's okay to kill someone if they have a prior criminal record or considered a menace to society. Well, it's not and it's time that it stops.

We need to be proactive and make sure laws that don't benefit us are changed. I will continue to say this until I can't say this anymore; we have to get out and VOTE during the mid-term elections. We need to make sure the right people are elected and the wrong people are removed from office, irrespective of their race. If the same people are in office (local officials) yet we are having some of the same problems, it's time for change. Vote for someone who wants to make a change. Don't just vote based on race or political affiliation; that's what has gotten us to this point where we are today. We have to be proactive or the next Jordan Davis might be our brother, our son, our nephew, our father or our friend. Let's do it. Get involved or get out of the way!!!!!



Daryl K. Washington is an attorney located in Dallas, Texas. His practice includes Sports and Entertainment, Civil Rights, Litigation and Business Transactions. You can reach Daryl at dwashington@dwashlawfirm.com or you can visit his website at www.dwashlawfirm.com. To receive updates, go to the Black Legal Issues page on Facebook and check the like button.


















Daryl K. Washington Nov-26-2013 1246 0
ARE WE DOING ENOUGH FOR THE BLACK COMMUNITIES?: I just finished talking to a mother who lost her son as a result of a police shooting. Hearing this mother talk about her son and how much he loved the holidays was simply heart wrenching. She went on to tell me that she's pleaded for help from our local politicians, pastors, leaders, etc. but no one wants to take her call, especially if the cameras are not rolling. To worsen matters, many of the leaders have put her son on trial and he's dead.

On last week they staged a protest in Dallas and sadly, 95% of the protestors were white. That made me wonder why do people make it in life and fail to reach back to help others? Why do people hear about injustices yet fail to say anything about it other than to say "that's sad!" During the 60's the leaders were individuals (black and white) who had college degrees, had bright futures ahead of them but they risk it all for us to be in the positions we are in today. The sad thing is that many of us believe it's all about us.

We must do more. We have to do more. We have to demand that our politicians and pastors step up to help us fight this battle. It truly takes a team effort. We must hold all of our community leaders accountable. When they ask for your vote, ask them to list ten things they did for the community in the last four years. Ask them how many times have they've attended a rally to show support to a grieving mother or father. We have serious issues and it takes all of us to stop this mess. I'm tired of seeing people who have never fought against a single injustice accept the Martin Luther King drum major for justice award. It's time for change.

Daryl K. Washington is an attorney located in Dallas, Texas. His practice includes Sports and Entertainment, Civil Rights, Litigation and Business Transactions. You can reach Daryl at dwashington@dwashlawfirm.com or you can visit his website at www.dwashlawfirm.com. To receive updates, go to the Black Legal Issues page on Facebook and check the like button.
Daryl K. Washington Oct-25-2013 1601 0
I have not said much about this situation because I was hoping it would not get to this point. I will keep this very short because I hope the talks of going forward with a lawsuit is short lived.

For the record, I will say that I was not happy that things transpired the way they did but because it did needed attention was given to the inequities in financial support received by HBCU's. I was initially upset because the thought of canceling a college football game is unheard of. However, if what the players said is true, it's not just about football. If there's proper follow-up to what happened at Grambling, it could benefit all HBCU's and perhaps provide an example for college athletes to follow in their attempts to receive a share of the billion dollar revenue received from college sports.

I understand this may not make sense to everyone but Jackson State suing Grambling is like a Black Greek Letter Organization suing Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. because he failed to show up at a fundraiser because an emergency required him to be at a last minute boycott where individuals were seeking equal treatment that would have the potential of benefiting everyone. As much as Grambling has done to benefit the SWAC I'm surprised that Jackson State would consider such drastic means. As a graduate of Grambling State University and a former member of the football team, I feel it's about time that Grambling do what Texas A&M and other schools have done in the past few years; change conferences. There's nothing but upside to it.

Daryl K. Washington is an attorney located in Dallas, Texas. His practice includes Sports and Entertainment, Civil Rights, Litigation and Business Transactions. You can reach Daryl at dwashington@dwashlawfirm.com or you can visit his website at www.dwashlawfirm.com. To receive updates, go to the Black Legal Issues page on Facebook and check the like button.
         User Submitted News
            Events Calendar 
 



Do you think enough is being done to combat the crime in Chicago?


Total Votes : 689390

Yes  0 %
No  100 %
Not sure  0 %
  0 %
Attorney Signup
 

All Content ?2008-2013 Black Legal Issues  unless otherwise stated.