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Samuel DuBose video appears to show two officers reinforced false account of police killing
Police officers in Cincinnati appear to have corroborated a false account of the fatal shooting of Samuel DuBose in the immediate aftermath of the incident, a detailed analysis of body-camera video released on Wednesday shows.

DuBose, an unarmed 43-year-old black man, was shot dead by white University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing on 19 July. The officer claimed he was “dragged” by DuBose’s vehicle following an altercation during a routine traffic stop, and was therefore forced to open fire, shooting DuBose once in the head.

On Wednesday, Tensing was indicted for murder after Hamilton County prosecutor Joseph Deters said body-camera footage, which he released at a press conference announcing the charge, showed the officer was not dragged during the encounter.

“It is our belief that he was not dragged. If you slow down this tape you see what happens, it is a very short period of time from when the car starts rolling to when a gun is out and he’s shot in the head,” Deters told reporters on Wednesday.

Related: 'Senseless' and 'asinine': prosecutor's words on Samuel DuBose killing a win for reformers

The footage shows that Tensing falls back, after DuBose is killed instantly by a single shot to the head and immediately chases after the vehicle. Deters said that DuBose’s limp body likely caused the car to accelerate.

A Guardian analysis of the nearly 28 minutes worth of Tensing’s body-camera footage released by the prosecutor’s office also shows the aftermath of the shooting and reveals that on three occasions, two other police officers repeat Tensing’s account that he was dragged by DuBose, and one of these officers claims to have witnessed it occurring.

To which a second officer, who stands out of the frame, replies: “Yeah, I saw that.”

Tensing continues: “I thought I was going to get run over. I was trying to stop him.”

Then, at six minutes and 54 seconds into the footage, while Tensing is seemingly conversing with the same officer, he states: “He was dragging me, man.”

The officer replies, “Yeah.” To which Tensing continues: “I got my hand and my arm caught inside.” The officer then replies, “Yeah, I saw that.”

The identity of this officer is not immediately clear. A copy of the University of Cincinnati Police Division’s information report on the shooting names university police officer Phillip Kidd as a witness to the entire event.

The information report, written by UC police officer Eric Weibel, states: “Officer Kidd told me that he witnessed the Honda Accord [DuBose’s vehicle] drag Officer Tensing, and that he witnessed Officer Tensing fire a single shot.”

Weibel’s report continues: “Looking at Officer Tensing’s uniform, I could see that the back of his pants and shirt looked as if it had been dragged over a rough surface.”

About 14 minutes into the video, while Tensing is still at the site of the shooting, but has now moved further away from DuBose’s crashed car, he is instructed by a third officer to indicate where the altercation had started.

This officer appears to be a member of the Cincinnati police department and wears a Sgt’s lapel on his arm. He states: “You can talk about anything you want except for what happened [sic]. The only thing that I ask of you is where did it start?”

Tensing replies: “I initiated the traffic stop at Vine and Thill.”

The two officers then clarify the direction Tensing was driving. The Sgt then states: “And, it looks like you got dragged if I’m understanding, looking ...”

To which Tensing replies: “Yes.”

The Hamilton County prosecutor’s office did not reply to a question from the Guardian after Deter’s press conference over whether any other officers were being investigated in relation the incident.

A representative for the UC police referred all questions to the prosecutor’s office. The Cincinnati police department did not respond to a request for comment.

At a rally in Cincinnati on Wednesday night organized by Black Lives Matter, protester James Yaacov Delaney said he thought the responding officers should be held accountable.

“They knew and they had plenty of opportunities to change their story about what occurred and they didn’t,” Delaney told the Guardian, as rain and night fell on Cincinnati.
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Jul-30-2015 117 0
Police officers in Cincinnati appear to have corroborated a false account of the fatal shooting of Samuel DuBose in the immediate aftermath of the incident, a detailed analysis of body-camera video released on Wednesday shows.

DuBose, an unarmed 43-year-old black man, was shot dead by white University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing on 19 July. The officer claimed he was “dragged” by DuBose’s vehicle following an altercation during a routine traffic stop, and was therefore forced to open fire, shooting DuBose once in the head.

On Wednesday, Tensing was indicted for murder after Hamilton County prosecutor Joseph Deters said body-camera footage, which he released at a press conference announcing the charge, showed the officer was not dragged during the encounter.

“It is our belief that he was not dragged. If you slow down this tape you see what happens, it is a very short period of time from when the car starts rolling to when a gun is out and he’s shot in the head,” Deters told reporters on Wednesday.

Related: 'Senseless' and 'asinine': prosecutor's words on Samuel DuBose killing a win for reformers

The footage shows that Tensing falls back, after DuBose is killed instantly by a single shot to the head and immediately chases after the vehicle. Deters said that DuBose’s limp body likely caused the car to accelerate.

A Guardian analysis of the nearly 28 minutes worth of Tensing’s body-camera footage released by the prosecutor’s office also shows the aftermath of the shooting and reveals that on three occasions, two other police officers repeat Tensing’s account that he was dragged by DuBose, and one of these officers claims to have witnessed it occurring.

To which a second officer, who stands out of the frame, replies: “Yeah, I saw that.”

Tensing continues: “I thought I was going to get run over. I was trying to stop him.”

Then, at six minutes and 54 seconds into the footage, while Tensing is seemingly conversing with the same officer, he states: “He was dragging me, man.”

The officer replies, “Yeah.” To which Tensing continues: “I got my hand and my arm caught inside.” The officer then replies, “Yeah, I saw that.”

The identity of this officer is not immediately clear. A copy of the University of Cincinnati Police Division’s information report on the shooting names university police officer Phillip Kidd as a witness to the entire event.

The information report, written by UC police officer Eric Weibel, states: “Officer Kidd told me that he witnessed the Honda Accord [DuBose’s vehicle] drag Officer Tensing, and that he witnessed Officer Tensing fire a single shot.”

Weibel’s report continues: “Looking at Officer Tensing’s uniform, I could see that the back of his pants and shirt looked as if it had been dragged over a rough surface.”

About 14 minutes into the video, while Tensing is still at the site of the shooting, but has now moved further away from DuBose’s crashed car, he is instructed by a third officer to indicate where the altercation had started.

This officer appears to be a member of the Cincinnati police department and wears a Sgt’s lapel on his arm. He states: “You can talk about anything you want except for what happened [sic]. The only thing that I ask of you is where did it start?”

Tensing replies: “I initiated the traffic stop at Vine and Thill.”

The two officers then clarify the direction Tensing was driving. The Sgt then states: “And, it looks like you got dragged if I’m understanding, looking ...”

To which Tensing replies: “Yes.”

The Hamilton County prosecutor’s office did not reply to a question from the Guardian after Deter’s press conference over whether any other officers were being investigated in relation the incident.

A representative for the UC police referred all questions to the prosecutor’s office. The Cincinnati police department did not respond to a request for comment.

At a rally in Cincinnati on Wednesday night organized by Black Lives Matter, protester James Yaacov Delaney said he thought the responding officers should be held accountable.

“They knew and they had plenty of opportunities to change their story about what occurred and they didn’t,” Delaney told the Guardian, as rain and night fell on Cincinnati.

Lolly Bowean Jul-30-2015 101 0
On the day he was finally released from prison after murder charges were dropped, Alprentiss Nash vowed he would use his freedom studying to become a chef, learning about antique cars and traveling.

And in the nearly three years since, he kept true to his word, visiting New Orleans, Miami and Atlanta and learning to ski at a resort in Wisconsin. He also bought a Harley-Davidson motorcycle and a 1960 Buick Electra 225 and completed a culinary program.

"He was really happy to be free, and he never talked about his time in prison," said Nash's mother, Yvette Martin. "He wanted to just get past it and be happy. He was overjoyed and excited about building a new life."

But on Tuesday afternoon, Nash's second chance at life came to a tragic end as he was gunned down while leaving a currency exchange in Chicago, according to Chicago police and his family. A person of interest is being questioned, authorities said.

Nash's family believes he was the target of an armed robbery.

After he was released from prison in August 2012, Nash obtained a certificate of innocence and a $200,000 payout from the state, his attorney said. And he was seeking millions of dollars in a federal lawsuit against the city of Chicago and a number of police officers.

As a result of the $200,000 payout and loans against the expected settlement of his lawsuit, Nash lived the good life, dressing extravagantly and driving a nice car. It could have attracted negative attention, his attorney and family said.

"He had been robbed last year," said Nash's attorney, Kathleen Zellner, who helped him win his exoneration and was representing him in his lawsuit. "He was stressed out, and he felt pressured and that people were after him. People thought he had money."

Close Nash relatives agreed.

"I think the money attracted the wrong people, and they were watching him," said his cousin, Coby Adolph. "He worked hard to get back into society. Being locked up for so long ... he was trying to get into the swing of things."

Nash, 40, who grew up in the Roseland neighborhood, was convicted in the 1995 murder of Leon Stroud during a home invasion and was sentenced to 80 years in prison.

During his 17 years in prison, Nash missed countless family celebrations, gatherings and milestones, including the funeral of his maternal grandmother and his son's entire childhood.

But he also earned his GED diploma and wrote the legal brief that eventually helped him win his freedom. DNA testing linked another man to a ski mask found near the crime scene, clearing Nash of the crime. Cook County prosecutors refused to say he was innocent but dismissed the murder charges.

On his release, Nash said he was determined not to be bitter.

"I'm on a new journey," he said that day. "As far as my life, it begins now, and I'm thankful."

Back in Chicago, Nash took on life with an urgency, his family said. He re-established bonds with his younger sister and took an interest in the nephews and nieces he met for the first time. He visited his mother weekly, driving her to errands and walking her to the lakefront to relax. He spent time with his maternal grandfather on the West Side.

"He wanted to be a good uncle, so he'd check up on the kids," said Nash's sister, Robin Martin. "We'd talk on the phone for hours about our childhood, the time before he was taken away."

He enrolled in a 13-week culinary arts program and took on an apprenticeship, said officials with Inspiration Corp.

"We had discussions about the stress of things he was experiencing, but he was always enthusiastic and faithful and determined to finish," said Sharon Ako, who was the head chef trainer who instructed him. "He was hard working. He got along with the other students and he was genuinely liked. It took tenacity and diligence to stick with it and take orders and learn the skills he needed to learn."

His family said Nash planned to move to New Orleans and open a restaurant but was taking life day by day in the meantime.

On Tuesday morning, his mother said Nash called her as he usually did. Hours later she learned he had been killed.

"I just screamed from my innermost belly because I wanted God to know I hurt," Martin said.

As she moved about her modest apartment Wednesday talking about her first-born son, Martin paused and wept out loud. The tears rolled down her face.

"Nothing has ever felt so heavy on my heart," she said. "All those years he was taken from us and to lose him again in a short amount of time.

"He got a second shot at life and then someone took it away. For nothing."

On the day he was killed, Nash sent a text message to his attorney just 30 minutes before the shooting, telling her he was out looking for a job. Despite his certificate of innocence, he had difficulty finding work.

"He was trying to have a normal life," Zellner said. "The streets are so vicious and so cruel."

MEG WAGNER Jul-29-2015 173 0
A University of Cincinnati cop was charged with murder on Wednesday for the quick-trigger shooting of an unarmed driver as prosecutors released disturbing body camera footage of the fatal traffic stop.

Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters ripped into Officer Ray Tensing during a news conference to announce the Grand Jury indictment in a killing that has set the city on edge.

“This is the most asinine act I've ever seen a police officer make — totally unwarranted,” Deters said of the July 19 shooting of 43-year-old Samuel DuBose. “This does not happen in the United States.”

The 25-year-old cop, who is white, surrendered at the county courthouse shortly after the indictment was handed up in the death of DuBose, who is black. The officer could face life in prison if convicted.

"We wanted the right thing to be done, the just thing to be done, the fair thing to be done," Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley told reporters. "We wanted the truth to come out."

Tensing pulled over DuBose near the university campus for a missing front license plate and fatally shot him after grilling the father of 10 about whether he had his driver’s license.

But Deters said video from the stop showed no such thing. Instead DuBose began to slowly pull away from the officer, and Tensing "fell backward after he shot (DuBose) in the head," the prosecutor said.

Tensing "purposely killed" DuBose, Deters said, adding that the cop "should have never been a police officer."

“He wasn't dealing with someone who was wanted for murder. He was dealing with someone who didn't have a front license plate,” Deters said, calling the traffic stop "chicken crap."

DuBose’s mother, Audrey DuBose, said she could forgive Tensing “if he asks,” and praised God for the indictment.

“I want everybody to just lift up their heads in prayer and thank God, because this one did not go unsolved,” the mother told reporters.
DuBose’s mother, Audrey DuBose, said she could forgive Tensing “if he asks,” and praised God for the indictment.
“I want everybody to just lift up their heads in prayer and thank God, because this one did not go unsolved,” the mother told reporters.

Earlier on Wednesday, Tensing's attorney Stewart Mathews said the Grand Jury indictment was likely “given the political climate.” But Mathews said given the evidence he'd seen, he didn't believe there should be an indictment.

Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell, who leads the separate city-run force, brushed off concerns the murder charge would make policing tougher for other officers faced with difficult situations.

"This officer was wrong," Blackwell said. "And when we're wrong, we have to be accountable."

DuBose's family had been pressing for the release of footage from Tensing's body-mounted camera following the deadly confrontation. The video showed the officer try to pull open the car door after DuBose failed to hand over a driver's license. DuBose shifted the car into gear, and Tensing immediately pulled his weapon and fired.
The car rolled down the street and came to a rest on the sidewalk. DuBose, shot in the head, was dead behind the wheel.

Tensions have run high following the killing. University President Santa Ono said he decided after speaking to police leaders to close the main campus on Wednesday as they waited for the news from the Grand Jury.

DuBose has a stepdaughter who is student at the university and recently returned from China, said Ono, who has met with the dead man's family.

The traffic stop shooting came amid months of national scrutiny of police dealings with African-Americans.

Mayor Cranley said prosecutor's decisive handling of the case should be a "model for the whole country" and called for peace. Bishop Bobby Hilton said there was "absolutely no reason" for any violence given the response by Deters and the Grand Jury to hold Tensing responsible.

"That brought a lot of solace," Hilton said. "That brought as much comfort as could be be expected to an enormous amount of pain."

Mourners packed Cincinnati’s Church of the Living God on Tuesday for DuBose’s funeral.

"I feel so sorry for this family and what they lost," Deters said Wednesday. "And I feel sorry for the community, too."

Tensing joined the university police force since April 2014 after working as both a part-time and full-time officer in Cincinnati suburb Greenhills for three years.

He received an overall satisfactory rating on his annual performance evaluation this April. It noted he was extremely strong in the traffic area and maintained control of his

Austin Siegemund-Broka Jul-28-2015 156 0
Terrence Howard's ex-wife filed suit against the actor Tuesday claiming he assaulted her in 2013.

In the civil complaint filed in Los Angeles, Michelle Howard claims the alleged assault took place while they were staying in a rental house in Costa Rica.

On the evening of July 29, 2013, Howard "followed Plaintiff into the restroom of the rental house and punched her on the left side of her face. Defendant also grabbed Plaintiff by her neck and pushed her against the bathroom wall and strangled her for several seconds," states the complaint. The filing continues he "grabbed her neck again and pinned her against the shower glass and her head hit the wall" when she tried to flee the room, leading the actor's son-in-law Billy to intervene.

"While Billy tried to pry Defendant's hands from Plaintiff's neck, Defendant whispered to Plaintiff, 'Remember what I told you in Bora Bora? That is what I'm gonna do,' referring to a prior instance where Defendant told Plaintiff that her body would never leave the island," states the complaint. "Plaintiff interpreted the reference to mean that Defendant was going to kill her."

Later on the evening of July 29, claims Michelle, he charged at her and she pepper-sprayed him in the face. "Defendant continued swinging his arms and caused Plaintiff to fall down. While Plaintiff was on the ground, Defendant repeatedly mule-kicked Plaintiff in the head and shoulders," states the complaint.

She claims assault and battery, intentional and negligent infliction of emotional distress. In the same complaint, she claims he defamed her by "mak[ing] accusations disseminated to the public through the media that Plaintiff had made death threats and other threats against Defendant and his family through various social media accounts."

She doesn't specify damages.

This is not the first time the Empire star has been accused of spousal abuse. He was arrested in 2001 on charges of assaulting his then-wife Lori McCommas, and in Michelle's 2011 divorce papers she claimed he repeatedly threatened and hit her throughout their marriage. In 2013, she received a restraining order against him on claims including the allegations regarding the Costa Rica trip in the Tuesday complaint.

Howard and executives for Fox, which airs Empire, were questioned about the accusations at the Television Critics Association's winter tour in January. Fox TV group chairs Dana Walden and Gary Newmanclaimed they weren't aware of the accusations until December 2014, when they were already in business with him, "A lot of the things I did were the product of not knowing how to deal with frustration, not knowing who Terrence Howard is," said the actor. "I've grown so much from anything that's happened in the past."

The Hollywood Reporter has reached out to Howard's reps for comment.

Ben Chapman Jul-28-2015 185 0
Teachers College Community School principal Jeanene Worrell-Breeden admitted to cheating on students' state reading exams before she committed suicide in April, according to an internal memo released by city Education Department officials Monday.

Worrell-Breeden threw herself in front of a subway train on April 17, the same day a whistleblower complained to the city's Special Commissioner of Investigation about the principal's cheating. Worrell-Breeden died on April 25.

The story of Worrell-Breeden's death was first confirmed by Education Department officials over the weekend, but the single-page memo on the investigation into the Harlem principal's misdeeds was just released Monday.

"This investigation substantiated the allegations of testing improprieties against Principal Breeden," states the internal Education Department memo submitted by city Education Department investigator Robert Small and dated June 9.

The reading exam scores of 47 third graders at Teachers College Community School were invalidated as a result of the investigation, Education Department officials said.

An Education Department spokeswoman declined to answer additional questions about the city's probe into cheating at the Harlem school.

Jason Silverstein Jul-28-2015 169 0
As racial tensions in Baltimore exploded earlier this year following the death of Freddie Gray, former Police Commissioner Anthony Batts allegedly lied about meeting with Gray's family, according to a letter from their attorney.

That accusation could add another disgrace to the career of the man who was fired earlier this month following the city’s violent riots and rising homicide rate.

As protests escalated following the death of the 25-year-old Gray, who died a week after suffering a spinal cord injury in police custody in April, Batts told media he had met with Gray’s grieving family.

But on April 24, just days before the most destructive night of rioting, the family’s lawyer called out Batts’ claim, according to the Baltimore Sun.

“It has come to our attention that you made statements claiming to have met with the family of Freddie Gray, Jr. about the investigation into his death,” the attorney, William H. Murphy, Jr., wrote in a letter to Batts.

“These statements are not true. Stated succinctly, you have not met with Mr. Gray's family. Please cease and desist making such statements.”

Murphy noted in his letter that he would have helped arranged any such meeting.

Batts was criticized for the police department's response to violent riots over Gray's death and the rising homicide rate following those riots.

Murphy copied Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake in the letter. Rawlings-Blake eventually chose to can Batts, saying he failed to make the city safer after the riots and “the people of Baltimore deserve better.”

His ouster came around the same time a city police union criticized the handling of the riots,

The riots resulting from Gray’s death led to about 200 officers getting injured and cost the city millions in damages from looting and fires. Police commissioners later revealed Batts and other top cops instructed officers at the riots to “not engage” demonstrators, even after violence broke out.

Six Baltimore officers now face charges for Gray’s death, which came after an alleged "rough ride" in a police van shattered most of his spinal cord.

Bobby Blanchard Jul-27-2015 237 0
Sandra Bland’s toxicology report, released on Monday, showed she had levels of marijuana in her system when she died.

The report detailed little new information and was brief. Waller County District Attorney Elton Mathis said additional tests will be conducted. After releasing the toxicology on Monday, he declined to comment on the findings. Mathis also announced he is forming an independent committee of former prosecutors and defense attorneys to review evidence about the arrest and death of Bland.

“There are many lingering questions regarding the death of Sandra Bland,” Mathis said.

Bland was pulled over on July 10 in Waller County for failing to signal a lane change. The routine traffic stop turned heated when Bland refused to put out a cigarette. Bland and the state trooper got in a screaming fight that ended in her arrest. Three days later she was found dead in her jail cell. Since then, her case has attracted national attention.

Medical examiners ruled the death a suicide and an autopsy report released on Friday said she died by suicide. But both the Texas Rangers and the FBI are conducting formal investigations into her death and arrest. Bland’s family has said they had no reason to think Bland might be depressed.

PHILIP CAULFIELD Jul-27-2015 183 0
"Krissy was and is an angel. I am completely numb at this time," the heartbroken father said in a statement Monday.

"My family must find a way to live with her in spirit and honor her memory. Our loss is unimaginable."

"We thank everyone for the prayers for Krissy and our family as we mourn my baby girl," the New Edition singer added.

Bobbi Kristina died Sunday at Peachtree Christina Hospice in Duluth, Ga., nearly six months after she was found floating unconscious in a water-filled bathtub at her home in Roswell, north of Atlanta.

Family members had spent months praying at her bedside, yet she never regained consciousness following the Jan 31. mishap.

The only child of Bobby Brown and the late Whitney Houston will be honored with a funeral in Atlanta and then flown to New Jersey to be buried beside her mother, according to a new report.

An autopsy was also planned to determine what led to her death, Fulton County authorities said.

In a statement Monday morning, the Fulton County Medical Examiner's Office says the time that elapsed since Brown was found until her death Sunday will "complicate" its effort.

Bobby Brown's remarks Monday were his first since his troubled daughter's passing.

In a separate statement, Brown's lawyer said Bobbi Kristina "fought to get well for months, however she has succumbed to her injuries."

"Yesterday Bobbi Kristina Brown took her place in heaven," the lawyer's statement said.

PETER SBLENDORIO Jul-27-2015 238 0
The longtime boyfriend of Bobbi Kristina Brown is on "suicide watch" following her death on Sunday, according to a report.

Nick Gordon was said to be inconsolable hours after Brown's passing, and those close to him feared he was considering taking his own life, a source told website Hollywood Life.

"Nick is on suicide watch," a source told the gossip site. "He is out of control with regret and sadness. He keeps saying that if only [Bobbi Kristina] had heard his voice, things would have been different. She may have lived."

Gordon had been living with Bobbi Kristina at her Roswell, Ga., home when she was found floating unconscious in the bathtub on Jan. 31. Her family members have said Gordon he had something to do with the incident, but he has maintained his innocence throughout.

Brown's father, singer Bobby Brown, banned Gordon from visiting her at the hospital, leading Gordon to make several public pleas to see her.

Two weeks ago, Gordon was slapped with a $10 million lawsuit accusing him of beating Bobbi Kristina while they were together and stealing from her while she was in a coma.

The civil complaint, filed in Fulton County, Ga., by Brown's court-appointed conservator Bedelia Hargrove, claimed Gordon caused "substantial" harm to Brown, including an incident when he punched her in the face, "knocking out a front tooth and (dragged) her upstairs by her hair."

It also accused Gordon of taking more than $11,000 out of her bank account days after Brown was hospitalized.

Brown, 22, passed away Sunday after months in a medically induced coma.

Larry Mcshane Jul-26-2015 163 0
Bobbi Kristina Brown, the tragic daughter whose short life mirrored her celebrated mother Whitney Houston's sad and untimely demise, died Sunday at age 22.

Brown, who battled many of the same demons as her seven-time Grammy-winning parent, died at Peachtree Christian Hospice in Duluth, Ga., almost six months after she was found unconscious in a water-filled bathtub at her home on Jan. 31, the Houston family told Entertainment Tonight.

"She is finally at peace in the arms of God," the family said in statement. "We want to again thank everyone for their tremendous amount of love and support during these last few months."

Family members, including her gospel star grandmother Cissy Houston, spent months praying for a miracle before surrendering to the inevitable and moving Bobbi Kristina to hospice care on June 24.

The doomed young woman — the only child of music royalty Houston and R&B singer Bobby Brown — never regained consciousness after she was found face-down and unresponsive.
The tub mishap occurred just 11 days before the third anniversary of her platinum-selling mom’s drug-addled bathtub drowning on Feb. 11, 2012.

The shocking death of her 48-year-old mega-star mom sent Bobbi Kristina into a spiral of depression, and she struggled with a drinking problem in the ensuing months.

The devastated daughter was also hospitalized for stress and anxiety within days of the passing.

A new book, “Whitney & Kristina,” claimed her problems predated the beloved singer’s sudden death: Bobbi was placed in a psychiatric hospital before her 15th birthday for trying to slash her wrists and stab her mother.

The teen also landed in drug rehab before a planned 18th birthday bash after photos surfaced of Bobbi snorting cocaine.

The aspiring singer/actress — who marked her 22nd birthday while in a coma on March 4 — became the subject of family in-fighting during her time in medical limbo.

Her court-appointed conservator filed a lawsuit charging her boyfriend Nick Gordon fought with Bobbi Kristina before she was discovered in the bathtub “with her mouth swollen and (a) tooth knocked out.”

Gordon also looted Brown’s bank account of more than $11,000 as she remained unconscious in a hospital bed, the lawsuit alleged.

The Roswell, Ga., police mounted a criminal investigation into the case, but no charges were ever brought. Police initially said that Gordon performed CPR and saved his girlfriend’s life after she was found in the tub.

Her aunt Leolah Brown, the sister of dad Bobby, wrote in a March Facebook post that Gordon was “under investigation for the attempted murder of my niece.”

There were reports that Gordon and Bobbi were married, but the wedding rumors were refuted after her death. The two met when Whitney Houston took Gordon in as her own “adopted son” to help out a friend.

And her hard-living dad Bobby Brown filed a recent lawsuit to take control of his comatose daughter’s estate, a move that could win him control of Bobbi’s multi-million dollar fortune.

He and his daughter shared a difficult relationship, and sometimes went for months without speaking.

Bobbi Kristina spent a life in the spotlight almost from her 1993 birth, becoming a regular on the reality series “Being Bobby Brown” alongside her mother and father.

Bobbi “has had cameras following her since she was born,” her aunt Pat Houston once said.

She was the only child of the rocky 15-year marriage between Houston and Brown — with Whitney winning custody of their daughter when the two divorced.

Life was tumultuous for the little girl with the two volatile, chart-topping parents. She joined Houston for a live Central Park duet of “Your Love Is My Love” in 2009, and the mother and daughter became best friends.

She had designs on her own music career, and was planning a Los Angeles recording studio visit in the days before she went into a coma.

Bobbi Kristina was destroyed by Houston's drowning in a Beverly Hills bathtub after ingesting a cocktail of prescription sedatives.

She disappeared for hours after her mom’s funeral, with one report — denied by her family — that she was using drugs immediately following the emotional New Jersey service.

Bobbi Kristina recounted in a 2012 interview with Oprah Winfrey that Whitney Houston still spoke with her from beyond the grave.

“She’s always with me, I can always feel her,” she said. “I can still sit there and I can still laugh with her ... I can still talk to her.”

Her subsequent appearance on another reality show, “The Houstons: On Our Own,” raised questions about her hard drinking in the wake of the tragedy.

Bobbi was shown slurring her words and stumbling in one episode.

She also feuded with grandmother Cissy Houston over the 2013 tell-all memoir “Remembering Whitney,” which detailed the diva’s drug woes and marital problems.

DAN BARRY Jul-26-2015 183 0
What the black state trooper saw was a civilian in distress. Yes, this was a white man, attending a white supremacist rally in front of the South Carolina State House. And yes, he was wearing a black T-shirt emblazoned with a swastika.

But the trooper concentrated only on this: an older civilian, spent on the granite steps. Overcome, it appeared, by an unforgiving July sun and the recent, permanent removal of a Confederate flag from state capitol display.

The trooper motioned for help from the Columbia fire chief, who is also black. Then, with a firm grip, he began walking the wilted white man up the steps toward the air-conditioned oasis of the State House. As they climbed, another state employee snapped a photograph to post on Twitter, where it continues to be shared around the world.

His name is Leroy Smith, and he happens to be the director of the South Carolina Department of Public Safety. He was at the rally, working crowd control, because he likes to signal to his 1,300 subordinates that he has their backs.

“I think that’s the greatest thing in the world — love,” said the burly, soft-spoken trooper, who is just shy of 50. “And that’s why so many people were moved by it.”

Earlier this month, Mr. Smith donned a dark business suit to join Gov. Nikki R. Haley and thousands of others in witnessing an honor guard of seven of his troopers march stone-faced toward a flagpole on the State House grounds. There, a few feet from a soaring Confederate monument, the white-gloved troopers lowered the Confederate flag in 30 seconds and presented it to an official from a state-supported museum.

Just like that, a red, blue and white battle flag — representing Southern white pride to some, Southern black oppression to others — was removed from the whims of the South Carolina breeze.

A different sort of photograph had helped to end the flag’s official stature. After images surfaced of the suspect in the Charleston shootings, a white man named Dylann Roof, posing with the Confederate flag — and after families of the victims publicly forgave him — Governor Haley said: Enough. Legislation was swiftly drafted, a law was signed, and this flag of pride was demoted to relic.

Now, on a hot Saturday afternoon eight days after that emotional ceremony, Mr. Smith was back at the capitol, only this time in his gray uniform and broad-brimmed campaign hat. A group called the Black Educators for Justice would be rallying in the early afternoon on the north side of the State House. And on the south side, a couple of hours later, the Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan would be demonstrating.

It promised to be a busy day.

Mr. Smith watched from the north side’s top granite step as black demonstrators vented their frustrations. Then he walked through the blessed cool of the State House to the south side, which faces the back of a statue of Strom Thurmond, the longtime senator and segregationist.

Bike-rack barricades had been arrayed to separate the white-supremacist demonstrators from a swelling crowd of people, some fresh from the black-empowerment rally on the north side. “You could kind of feel the tension in the air,” Mr. Smith recalled.

Soon the demonstrators, a few dozen, came marching from the west, flanked by Mr. Smith’s “advance civil emergency response team.” Many wore the black shirts of the National Socialist Movement, a neo-Nazi organization that, according to its website, believes: “Only those of pure White blood, whatever their creed, may be members of the nation. Noncitizens may live in America only as guests and must be subject to laws for aliens. Accordingly, no Jew or homosexual may be a member of the nation.”

These people entered their State House pen and waved their Confederate flags. The public-address system they were said to have ordered never arrived, so all they could do was exchange taunts with hecklers and issue occasional bleats of “White power!” and “Wooo!”

The heat turned up a notch: a bottle thrown, some jostling at the barricades. Mr. Smith called his commanders down to a lower level because, he said, “we were getting ready to work a little.”

Then a demonstrator directed his attention to an older man all but melting on a bottom step. “He looked fatigued, lethargic — weak,” Mr. Smith said. “I knew there was something very wrong with him.”

He called up the steps to the Columbia fire chief, Aubrey Jenkins, for assistance. Then, with his left arm around the man’s back and his right hand on the man’s right arm, he walked the swastika-adorned demonstrator up the steps, as many as 40. Slowly, steadily, all the while giving encouragement:

We’re going to make it. Just keep on going.

A female demonstrator shadowed the climb. On the back of her black shirt appeared a familiar white-supremacist slogan (“Because the beauty of the White Aryan woman must not perish from the earth”). She kept asking Mr. Smith whether the man was going to be all right — as if his safety, as well as his health, might be in some jeopardy.

Up the steps the two men went. They didn’t talk much, although the older demonstrator allowed that he wasn’t from around here. A spokesman for the National Socialist Movement declined to identify him, other than to say he is a senior citizen who doesn’t need people knocking at his door.

Mr. Smith isn’t from around here, either. Born in Haines City, Fla., the fifth and last child of transplants from Alabama. Mom worked at home while Dad worked in the citrus groves. Went to an all-black elementary school and then to an integrated high school, where those with Confederate flags on their pickups never bothered him.

Four years in the Navy. Then, after a brief spell in retail — “I sold cars, and I was pretty good at it” — a long career with the Florida Highway Patrol, where he rose through the ranks. After that, his appointment in 2011 as the first African-American director of South Carolina’s Department of Public Safety.

“In that moment, Leroy Smith was the embodiment of all that,” Mr. Godfrey said. He quickly shared the moment with the world — to the benefit, it must be said, of his boss, Governor Haley, as she tries to lead her state beyond its racially troubled past.

Mr. Smith did not know about the photograph. He knew only what was before him. He walked the man into the air-conditioned State House, led him to a green-upholstered couch, and left him there to cool down.

DeNeen L. Brown Jul-26-2015 176 0
A month after a black police chief was fired amid allegations of racism, Justice Department officials traveled to Pocomoke City, Md., to meet with local leaders about the chief’s termination.

Justice representatives also talked with residents last week about two other issues roiling the community: accusations that a 2011 federal police grant was misused and allegations of irregularities in a recent city council election.

“We are looking at the chief’s termination,” Charles Phillips, a mediator for the department’s community relations service, told dozens of residents Wednesday night at New Macedonia Baptist Church, according to a video recorded by the Real News Network. “We are looking at some of the other issues — voter irregularities — that were mentioned.”

Pocomoke, a community of 4,000 that bills itself as “The Friendliest Town on the Eastern Shore,” has been divided since the majority-white city council fired Kelvin Sewell, the town’s first black police chief.

In a complaint filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Sewell alleged that he was ousted because he refused to dismiss two black officers who complained about working in a racially hostile environment. On Friday evening, Sewell’s mostly African American supporters held a rally and called for the resignation of Pocomoke City Mayor Bruce Morrison.

[Racial turmoil in ‘Friendliest Town’ after black police chief is fired]

Morrison and the Pocomoke City Council have not offered an explanation for the decision to fire Sewell, 52, who took over the 15-officer department in 2010 after retiring from the Baltimore City police.


“That is a personnel matter,” said Pocomoke City Attorney William Hudson. “I cannot comment on it.”

In his EEOC complaint, Sewell said that he was told by the mayor that he was fired for “incompetence,” despite a significant drop in crime in Pocomoke City during his tenure.

Last week, during the community meeting with Justice Department representatives, residents demanded that Sewell be reinstated to the position now occupied by Maryland State Police Lt. Earl W. Starner. Starner was appointed by the mayor July 6 to serve as interim police chief.

Residents at the meeting also raised concerns about other issues that they said show a pattern of abuse of power by city leaders. Those issues included the alleged misuse of a $212,000 DOJ grant designated for new police hiring and the cancellation of a recent municipal election.

The controversy over the community policing grant may have played a role in the city’s decision to fire Sewell, said City Council member Diane Downing, the only African American on the council and the only member to vote against getting rid of the chief.

At a closed-door meeting with city officials three days before he was terminated, Sewell was asked whether he’d gone to the Justice Department with questions about the way the grant money was used by longtime Pocomoke City Manager Russell W. Blake, Downing said.

“They asked Chief Sewell, ‘Did you contact the Department of Justice?’ The mayor and the city attorney questioned him as to why he called them,” said Downing, who attended the meeting. He acknowledged that he had, she said.

Downing and others think the Justice Department is investigating whether the grant money was misused. Blake, who retired June 30 after 40 years in that position, did not return calls for comment.

“DOJ was first interested in the grant; now they are interested in his firing,” Downing said.

Hudson, the city attorney, denied that anything improper had occurred. A Justice Department spokesman declined to comment.

Another issue that residents raised during the community meeting with Justice Department representatives was a canceled election for a District 4 city council seat that was not advertised.

City officials halted it after the incumbent council member, Tracey Cottman, withdrew her candidacy for reelection in the majority-black district. Cottman’s withdrawal came after the 60-day filing deadline, making her white opponent, Brian Hirshman, the only candidate on the ballot.

Residents complained that they never knew that the election was canceled because the city did not advertise the cancellation in local newspapers. The Pocomoke City charter permits the city to cancel an uncontested election but requires it to give the public notice “by publication for two successive weeks in a newspaper or newspapers having general circulation in the city.”

During a city council meeting earlier this month, Morrison told residents that the notice had been published. But last week, city officials acknowledged the notice was never published.

Hudson called that an oversight, but said, “I don’t think it would have deprived any would-be candidates of the legal right to run in that district because the filing deadline had long since passed.”

But Deborah A. Jeon, the legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland, sent a letter April 14 requesting that Pocomoke City delay Hirshman’s swearing in because of concerns about the lack of notification. She wrote that the district has a black majority and that Pocomoke City, which elected its council members at-large until it faced a 1985 legal challenge to the practice, had a history of disenfranchising its African American residents.

Jeon argued that the failure to publish a notice that the District 4 election was canceled was a violation of the city’s charter and that the city’s actions prevented one would-be black candidate from mounting a last-minute campaign against Hirshman, who was sworn in by the mayor at a city council meeting on April 14. When reached by phone, Hirshman, who works as a police officer in Berlin, said he had no comment on the election.

“What happened here with respect to this municipal election is extremely troubling,” Jeon said in an interview. “Given the history in this community and that African Americans had to bring a federal voting-rights challenge to gain an adequate right to vote and fair representation in the town’s election system, canceling that election without notice to those in the community is simply unfair and should be considered unlawful.”

Deborah Hastings Jul-26-2015 172 0
A South Carolina woman was sentenced Friday to life in prison for hiring her teenage lover to kill her husband. But the 16-year-old shot to death the wrong man.

Instead of killing Dale Phillips, the teenager mistakenly murdered the man's brother, prosecutors said.

Karlita Phillips will spend the rest of her life behind bars, said Greenwood County Solicitor David Stumbo, WHNS-TV reported Friday.

Circuity Judge Frank Addy Jr. called the woman's actions "reprehensible."

Jamil Phillips, 31, was shot dead as he stood on his parent's porch in 2013 in Abbeville. The intended target, Dale Phillips, was living at the house.

The hit man was Tavirous Settles, whom Karlita had promised to pay $13,000 for bumping off her estranged husband. Settles, who is now 17, has already been convicted of killing a Guatemalan national in an unrelated assassination in Greenwood County in 2013.

He testified that he and Karlita were lovers, and that she drove him to Phillips family home, where he mistook Jamil for Dale.

Prosecutors said Karlita was motivated by hatred and greed.

She was convicted of solicitation of a minor to commit a felony and accessory to murder.

Karlita hoped to cash in her husband's $500,000 insurance policy, plus another $25,000 life insurance policy she purchased several months after they separated.

>>--More Black Legal News

Sep-09-2014 1764 0
On yesterday social media went crazy after the video of Ray Rice was released. Within hours Rice was released from the Ravens. Don't think for one second that it was not as a result of the public outcry on social media. The Ravens and the NFL did not have a choice but to release Rice because they had been exposed. However, the saddening part about of all of this is that the powers to be proclaimed they had not seen the video until yesterday.

Why do we live in a society where there's always a cover-up? If we are going to be angry at the police chief in Ferguson, MO for trying to cover up for one of his officers who killed Michael Brown we should also be upset with Commissioner Roger Goodell and Coach John Harbaugh because it appears that they took part in a scheme to deceive the public and by tuning in to the games as usual we are saying it's okay to cover-up a crime. Sean Payton, head coach of the Saints, was forced to sit out a year because an alleged wrongdoing took place under his watch. In my opinion, the same needs to happen to the Roger Goodell and Coach Harbaugh because somehow I think they knew and if they did not know it's even worse because they allowed a poor investigation to support a two game suspension.

Let's look at the severity of what they did. Their actions in trying to protect the NFL brand send the wrong message to ladies who are victims of domestic abuse. What the message says is that you should protect the abuser if there's something to lose. In this case, it was football games and plenty of revenue for a major brand. Their actions could help persuade a victim of domestic abuse to participate in a press conference in order to save a star and risk her life. This was not the right thing to do because someone following that same example could end up dead.

Releasing and/or suspending Rice for the year was the proper thing to do months ago but there are additional suspensions that need to be handed down before we stop talking about this. Take a year off Mr. Commissioner and Coach Harbaugh because you dropped the ball on this one. Better yet, if you won't suspend yourselves, donate your salaries for the year to a charity that supports domestic violence victims if you are really serious about the mistake that was made.

Daryl K. Washington is an attorney located in Dallas, Texas. His practice includes Sports and Entertainment, Civil Rights, Litigation and Business Transactions. You can reach Daryl at dwashington@dwashlawfirm.com or you can visit his website at www.dwashlawfirm.com. To receive updates, go to the Black Legal Issues page on Facebook and check the like button.
Daryl K. Washington Feb-16-2014 2362 0
After the Michael Dunn verdict was read many voice their displeasure with the judicial system, rightfully so. However, the killing of our young black men is nothing new. Each time something bad happens we come together as a group for a month or so and then the energy dies down. When the Zimmerman verdict came back there were those who demanded that we stop supporting the state of Florida yet what happened to the follow-up to let us know how effective the efforts were? It reminds me of whenever someone dies. When we run into people we have not seen in years we all make a vow to do better and to make time for each other but after two or three months has past by we are all back to doing the same things.

As a country, we came together after 9/11 but soon thereafter the unity went away. There's so much happening in our communities. I thought the Zimmerman verdict would be our wake up call to do more but our young black men continue to be gunned down at a high rate by Men who don't look anything close to their fathers and most of them get away with it. Just in case you mention the black on black crime, remember that the killer normally ends up in prison.

Just recently, the grand jury failed to indict a North Carolina police officer for the killing of Jonathan Ferrell, a young black male, but after there was a public outcry about the injustice that took place he was eventually indicted. Right here in Dallas, Texas we have black men being killed by white police officers and in a great majority of the cases, the police officers are not indicted and judged by a jury of their peers. Instead, the victim is placed on trial and society has become conditioned to believe that it's okay to kill someone if they have a prior criminal record or considered a menace to society. Well, it's not and it's time that it stops.

We need to be proactive and make sure laws that don't benefit us are changed. I will continue to say this until I can't say this anymore; we have to get out and VOTE during the mid-term elections. We need to make sure the right people are elected and the wrong people are removed from office, irrespective of their race. If the same people are in office (local officials) yet we are having some of the same problems, it's time for change. Vote for someone who wants to make a change. Don't just vote based on race or political affiliation; that's what has gotten us to this point where we are today. We have to be proactive or the next Jordan Davis might be our brother, our son, our nephew, our father or our friend. Let's do it. Get involved or get out of the way!!!!!



Daryl K. Washington is an attorney located in Dallas, Texas. His practice includes Sports and Entertainment, Civil Rights, Litigation and Business Transactions. You can reach Daryl at dwashington@dwashlawfirm.com or you can visit his website at www.dwashlawfirm.com. To receive updates, go to the Black Legal Issues page on Facebook and check the like button.


















Daryl K. Washington Nov-26-2013 2739 0
ARE WE DOING ENOUGH FOR THE BLACK COMMUNITIES?: I just finished talking to a mother who lost her son as a result of a police shooting. Hearing this mother talk about her son and how much he loved the holidays was simply heart wrenching. She went on to tell me that she's pleaded for help from our local politicians, pastors, leaders, etc. but no one wants to take her call, especially if the cameras are not rolling. To worsen matters, many of the leaders have put her son on trial and he's dead.

On last week they staged a protest in Dallas and sadly, 95% of the protestors were white. That made me wonder why do people make it in life and fail to reach back to help others? Why do people hear about injustices yet fail to say anything about it other than to say "that's sad!" During the 60's the leaders were individuals (black and white) who had college degrees, had bright futures ahead of them but they risk it all for us to be in the positions we are in today. The sad thing is that many of us believe it's all about us.

We must do more. We have to do more. We have to demand that our politicians and pastors step up to help us fight this battle. It truly takes a team effort. We must hold all of our community leaders accountable. When they ask for your vote, ask them to list ten things they did for the community in the last four years. Ask them how many times have they've attended a rally to show support to a grieving mother or father. We have serious issues and it takes all of us to stop this mess. I'm tired of seeing people who have never fought against a single injustice accept the Martin Luther King drum major for justice award. It's time for change.

Daryl K. Washington is an attorney located in Dallas, Texas. His practice includes Sports and Entertainment, Civil Rights, Litigation and Business Transactions. You can reach Daryl at dwashington@dwashlawfirm.com or you can visit his website at www.dwashlawfirm.com. To receive updates, go to the Black Legal Issues page on Facebook and check the like button.
Daryl K. Washington Oct-19-2013 4334 0
I don't know all of the specifics and I most certainly will not respond to all of the comments, especially some of the racists comments I've read because if it continues I will personally make a National Call for all of the black athletes, especially the ones who attend the large institutions like LSU, Penn State, USC, etc., to stand in unity with the players at Grambling so that a true change can be made in college athletics. If you want to see changes made and need to bring attention to problems, you can learn from the athletes at Grambling. Let's see how many people will comment about this when their teams are not playing because the athletes are tired of not receiving a share of the billion dollars. The funniest thing I've read were the comments from some black people who did not attend a HBCU acting like it was not their problem but ours.

When Martin Luther King was assassinated in Memphis he was there to help the Black garbage collectors, not the Black Preachers. I'm glad he did not see it as their problems. Do we turn our backs on people just because it does not personally impact us? I personally wish things could have been handled differently but now that the ball is in motion, it's time for SOLUTIONS.

I will not let Grambling State University take all of the blame for this. First, we have to look at the leadership of the State of La. and what he has done. A lot of the problems start with him, although a lot of his supporters will beg to differ. Had he not played the politics and did what was in the best interest of the state of La., things may be different. Second, we have to look at the NCAA. For years the NCAA has turned its back to the cheating in recruiting because it does not want to penalize the large schools that help bring billions of dollars to the bottom line. Demand needs to be made to institute a revenue sharing program similar to what's in the NFL so that the small schools that play by the rules receive a share of the revenue made by the big schools who use an unfair advantage to recruit.

Finally, now that this problem has been brought to light, I hope some of the wealthy people in our country remember that but for Grambling and other HBCU's there would be no RG3, Russell Wilson, Michael Vick, Kap, etc. so start giving to the HBCU's. Let's not turn our backs on the HBCUs because you did not attend. Remember, if our President is not able to nominate one or two individuals to the Supreme Court before his term is up, Affirmative Action will be under attack and if some decisions are reversed, where will our kids go if there are no HBCUs? Will it be only our problems then? It's time to wake up.

Daryl K. Washington is an attorney located in Dallas, Texas. His practice includes Sports and Entertainment, Civil Rights, Litigation and Business Transactions. You can reach Daryl at dwashington@dwashlawfirm.com or you can visit his website at www.dwashlawfirm.com. To receive updates, go to the Black Legal Issues page on Facebook and check the like button.
Daryl K. Washington Jul-17-2013 1402704 0
I've finally had the opportunity to review the complaint filed against Paula Deen. For one, many people have been making this incident about the "N" word only, but it's much more than that. I personally find it to be offensive whenever someone from another race is accused of using the "N" word they are somehow given a pass because of the use of the "N" word by some in the black communities. Let me be the first to say that I find the use of the word by anyone to be wrong. However, when it's used in a racist or insulting manner, it hurts more.

I think individuals who are trying to defend Paula Deen's use of the "N' word should probably familiarize themselves with all of the facts of the case against her. Just so you know, in case you didn't know, the person who initiated the complaint against Paula Deen and her brother is not "Black." She is a "white female" who was subjected to years of abuse and was finally fed up with her black employees being treated poorly, so stop thinking it was a black person complaining about Paula Deen's use of the N word. Furthermore, Paula Deen indicated that she used the N word over 20 years ago. That is not what's being alleged against her. She went as far as telling a guy he was as black as a blackboard. That lady is something else and I'm glad I never supported any of her ventures. I personally find it insulting that so many black people are coming to the defense of Paula Deen after reading what she and her family subjected their employees to. When I learned about the major companies dropping Paula Deen without being demanded to do so, I knew it was deep. The fact that any civil rights activist is supporting Paula Deen is insulting and is a slap in the face.

Here's a summary of some of the things being alleged against Paula Deen, her brother Bubba Hiers and the Deen business entities:

Summary:

Paula Deen, while planning her brother's wedding in 2007, was asked what look the wedding should have. She replied, "I want a true southern plantation-style wedding." When asked what type of uniforms the servers should wear, Paula stated, "well what I would really like is a bunch of little n*ggers to wear long-sleeve white shirts, black shorts and black bow ties, you know in the Shirley Temple days, they used to tap dance around;

Black staff had to use the back entrance to enter and leave restaurant;

Black staff could only use one bathroom;

Black staff couldn’t work the front of the restaurants;

Brother Bubba stated his wishes: “ I wish I could put all those n*ggers in the kitchen on a boat to Africa”;

Bubba asked a black driver and security guard "don’t you wish you could rub all the black off you and be like me? You just look dirty; I bet you wish you could." The guy told Bubba he was fine as is;

Bubba on President Obama: they should send him to the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, so he could n*gger-rig it;

He shook an employee (Black again) and said” F your civil rights…you work for me and my sister Paula Deen;

Paula’s son Jaime's best friend managed the Lady & Sons restaurant. He threatened to fire all the 'Monkeys' in the kitchen. When Paula found out…she slapped him on the wrist and suggested that the employee visited Paula's $13,000,000 mansion so he felt special and could be massaged.

I feel Paula Deen, her brother and anyone who treats people poorly should not be given a free pass. I wonder if Paula is truly sorry that she used the "N" word or that she was reported by someone who looks just like her. I appreciate the lady having the courage to report Paula Deen. It's people like her and the videographer who leaked the 47% comments made by Mitt Romney who should be receiving the attention, not Paula Deen.


Daryl K. Washington is an attorney located in Dallas, Texas. His practice includes Sports and Entertainment, Civil Rights, Litigation and Business Transactions. The opinions expressed in the commentary are those of Daryl K. Washington. You can follow Daryl on twitter at dwashlawfirm or you can email him at dwashington@dwashlawfirm.com or visit his website at www.dwashlawfirm.com. Go to the Black Legal Issue Home page and check the like button to receive future updates.

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